Our Self Check can help you get a better sense of the most common symptoms of depression and the impact they may be having on your life.

Each question asks about a different symptom and how it has been affecting you over the last two weeks. Depression consists of a lot more than sadness, so the questions aren’t only about your mood. Depression also affects:

  • How you think (for eg. your ability to concentrate or make decisions)
  • What you think about (for eg. thoughts of failure or pessimism about the future)
  • Your body and behaviour (for eg. lack of energy or poor sleep)

As you go through the Self Check, answer as honestly as you can. Being honest with yourself about how you are doing is a key step toward improving your mental health.

After you complete and submit the Self Check, we’ll provide some tailored tips and advice based on your score to help you better manage and improve your mental health.

There are also some overlapping health issues, like thyroid problems, that can cause symptoms that are similar to depression. If your Self Check score is high, it’s important to see a doctor who can help get you set up with appropriate treatments and rule out other potential health issues.

Whatever your Self Check score is, there are ways to improve your life, and we’ll do our best to guide you. Taking the Self Check on its own won’t lessen your symptoms, but putting the tips and advice we offer into practice will help you move forward on the road to recovery.

We often set aside our own health and prioritize things like work and other responsibilities, but depression is as real of an illness as any other, like diabetes or high blood pressure, and is best treated with support from a doctor and/or mental health professionals.  Delaying treatment when you need it only makes things worse.

What is your gender?

ManWomanNon-binary

Please enter your age

Over the past 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by the following problems

Little interest or pleasure in doing things

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Trouble falling or staying asleep, or sleeping too much

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Feeling tired or having little energy

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Poor appetite or overeating

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Feeling bad about yourself — or that you are a failure or have let yourself or your family down

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Trouble concentrating on things, such as reading the newspaper or watching television

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Moving or speaking so slowly that other people could have noticed? Or the opposite — being so fidgety or restless that you have been moving around a lot more than usual

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Thoughts that you would be better off dead or of hurting yourself in some way

Not at allSeveral daysMore than half of the daysNearly every day

Gender:

HeadsUpGuys asks about gender to help us better understand our visitors, learn more about men's mental health, and inform the creation of future content.

Your score is :

score

It’s time to take action

Your score is quite high and indicates that you are struggling. Though you may be feeling overwhelmed, scores like this aren’t uncommon and many men have gotten better after facing similar struggles with depression.

This level of symptoms should not be ignored. With symptoms this severe, it’s crucial to prioritize your health and seek professional support and guidance.

Where to start:

If you haven’t connected with a professional

It’s time to connect with a doctor and/or a qualified therapist as soon as possible. It may take some time to set up an appointment or find a therapist, but we can help guide you through the process.

Why see a doctor?

  • Doctors can help assess your symptoms, identify what may be causing them, and connect you with other health professionals and local resources.
  • Our guide to consulting a doctor can let you know what to expect, what you can ask, and how to make the most of your appointment.

GUIDE TO CONSULTING A DOCTOR

Why see a therapist?

  • Therapists can help you understand where issues are coming from, work on recognizing and breaking negative thought patterns, and how to manage symptoms of depression.
  • Our guide to talk therapy has info on what therapy is, how it can work, and how to use it to better your health.
  • Our Therapist Directory lists qualified therapists who have experience treating men with depression.

Find a Therapist

If you have professional support, but don’t feel like you are making progress

Fighting depression is tough, and everyone’s journey looks different. It’s normal to have ups and downs on the way to recovery.

  • Talk to your supports (doctor and/or therapist) about how you are doing and ask about additional support or strategies you can try.
  • Consider adding to your support team. Finding the right team takes time and is part of the recovery process. This could include a combination of:
    • a family doctor
    • a psychiatrist
    • a therapist
    • a social worker
    • a virtual men’s/peer support group
  • Stick with your current recovery strategies and stay hopeful – if you’re using all your supports to their full advantage, you may just need more time to get to where you want to be.

NEXT STEPS:

GUIDE TO CONSULTING A DOCTOR Find a Therapist

Learn more about depression and recovery

  1. Read through our website to learn more about depression in men.
  2. Work on our practical tips to support your mental health and improve your health overall.
  3. Browse our stories and articles. Some of our popular posts include:
  4. Learn how to reach out to friends and family for support.

Fighting depression isn’t a race, and like most illnesses, there aren’t any quick fixes – but you can get better. Stay hopeful. Make your health a priority, connect with the right supports, and believe in your ability to recover.

Try our Stress Test to help identify what’s causing stress in your life and prioritize what to work on. Your results can also help serve as a kick-starter for conversations with a doctor or therapist.

TAKE STRESS TEST


It’s time to take action

Your score is indicating probable depression. This level of symptoms should not be ignored.

With symptoms like these, it’s important to prioritize your health and seek professional support and guidance.

Where to start:

If you haven’t connected with a professional

Connecting with a doctor and/or a qualified therapist is a great first step. It may take some time to set up an appointment or find a therapist, but we can help guide you on your way.

Why see a doctor?

  • Doctors can assess your symptoms, identify what may be causing them, and connect you with other health professionals and local resources.
  • Our guide to consulting a doctor lets you know what to expect, what you can ask, and how to make the most of your appointment.

GUIDE TO CONSULTING A DOCTOR

Why see a therapist?

  • Therapists can help you understand where issues are coming from, work on recognizing and breaking negative thought patterns, and learn how to manage symptoms of depression.
  • Our guide to talk therapy has info on what therapy is, how it can work, and how to use it to better your health.
  • Our Therapist Directory lists qualified therapists who have experience treating men with depression.

Find a Therapist

If you have professional support, but don’t feel like you are making progress

Fighting depression is tough, and everyone’s journey looks different. It’s normal to have ups and down on the way to recovery.

  • Talk to your supports (doctor and/or therapist) about how you are doing and ask about additional support or strategies you can try.
  • Consider adding to your support team. Finding the right team takes time and is part of the recovery process. This could include a combination of:
    • a family doctor
    • a psychiatrist
    • a therapist
    • a social worker
    • and/or a virtual men’s/peer support group
  • Stick with your current recovery strategies and stay hopeful – if you’re using all your supports to your full advantage, you may just need more time to get to where you want to be.

NEXT STEPS:

GUIDE TO CONSULTING A DOCTOR Find a Therapist

Learn more about depression and recovery

  1. Read through our website to learn more about depression in men.
  2. Work on our practical tips to improve your health and support your overall mental health.
  3. Browse our stories and articles. Some of our popular posts include:
  4. Learn how to reach out to friends and family for support.

Fighting depression isn’t a race and, like most illnesses, there aren’t any quick fixes – but you can get better, stay hopeful. Make your health a priority, connect with the right supports, and believe in your ability to recover.

Try our Stress Test to help identify what’s causing stress in your life and prioritize what to work on. Your results can also help serve as a kick-starter for conversations with a doctor or therapist.

TAKE STRESS TEST


Things are looking pretty good

Things are looking okay right now, but it’s important to continue checking in to monitor your mental health.

  • Our Practical Tips can help you work on key life skills that can greatly benefit your mental health (like how to improve your sleep habits, physical activity, social life, eating habits, and intimate relationships).

If you ever start to feel pulled down by the symptoms of depression, act early and reach out.

Try our Stress Test to help identify things that might be causing stress in your life, which could put you at risk for developing depression if not managed appropriately.

NEXT STEPS:

Practical Tips Take Stress Test


Track Your Progress

Here is a recap of your responses. You have the option to save your responses for your own use, or to print to bring to your doctor or specialists. We highly encourage you to save your results to record your symptoms and monitor your improvement.