Each question asks about a symptom of depression. The questions aren’t only about your mood, because depression also affects:

  • How you think (your ability to concentrate or make decisions)
  • What you think about (thoughts of failure or pessimism about the future)
  • Your body and behaviour (lack of energy or poor sleep)

For some people, depression doesn’t result in sadness, but may show up as anger, irritability, or not feeling much of anything at all. By completing the Self Check you are also helping us understand how the experience of depression might vary for people of different genders.

 Yes No

Please choose your gender

 Male Female Other

Please enter your age

Over the past 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by the following problems

Little interest or pleasure in doing things

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Engaging in more risk-taking behaviour (e.g., gambling, sex, drugs)

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Feeling angry, irritable or more aggressive

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Trouble falling or staying asleep, or sleeping too much

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Feeling tired or having little energy

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Feeling stressed out

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Poor appetite or overeating

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Feeling bad about yourself — or that you are a failure or have let yourself or your family down

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Trouble concentrating on things, such as reading the newspaper or watching television

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Moving or speaking so slowly that other people could have noticed? Or the opposite — being so fidgety or restless that you have been moving around a lot more than usual

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

Thoughts that you would be better off dead or of hurting yourself in some way

 Not at all Several days More than half of the days Nearly every day

SELF-CHECK RESEARCH

The research objective associated with the self-check is to identify the types of depressive symptoms that are commonly reported by men.

CONFIDENTIALITY

Should you agree to participate in the self-check research project, your self-check responses will be recorded and grouped together with responses from other participants to be analysed and reported in our future research reports, academic papers and/or at conferences. You will be asked to provide us with your gender and age. We will not ask for information that can personally identify you.

Should you choose to not participate in the self-check research project, you are welcome to complete the self-check, if you wish, but your responses will not be saved or recorded.

By agreeing to participate in the self-check research project, you certify that 1) you are 19 years of age or older and competent to accept this agreement in your own name; 2) you have read and understood this agreement prior to accepting it; and 3) you are aware that by accepting this consent, you are giving permission to Dr. Ogrodniczuk and the research team to connect your gender and age to your self-check responses and use those data in our future research reports, academic papers and/or conference presentations. Your participation is voluntary, which means that you are not being forced to have your self-check responses recorded.

If you have any further questions, please contact; Dr. John Ogrodniczuk at 604-822-8034 john.ogrodniczuk@ubc.ca

If you have any concerns or complaints about your rights as a research participant and/or your experiences while participating in this study, contact the Research Participant Complaint Line in the UBC Office of Research Ethics at 604-822-8598 or if long distance e-mail RSIL@ors.ubc.ca or call toll free 1-877-822-8598.

Your score is :

score

If you score 10 or higher (or you’ve been having a hard time in your daily life—at work or getting stuff done at home):

  • It is a good idea to make an appointment to Consult a Doctor or a mental health professional who can evaluate your symptoms.
  • Receiving a high score or having a hard time keeping up with life can also “look like” depression but actually reflect something else (the recent death of loved one, a thyroid gland that isn’t working properly, etc.) - a doctor can help you determine the cause and get you on the right track.
  • Have a look through the Take Action section of our website, which includes practical tips, advice on how to reach out to others, and information about professional services.

If you score lower than 10 and you are not having a hard time keeping up in your daily life:

  • You can still improve your health by looking over our Practical Tips, which includes information on how to improve sleep habits, stress management, social life, eating habits, and intimate relationships. If you ever start to get pulled down by the symptoms of depression, act early and reach out.

Track Your Progress

Here is the recap of your responses. You have an option to save your responses for your own use, or print to bring to your doctor or specialists. We highly encourage you to save your results to record your symptoms and improvement.